MEM-ORPHOSIS

“Do not trust your memory; it is a net full of holes; the most beautiful prizes slip through it.” Georges Duhamel

Mem-orphosis investigates the neuroscience of the human memory. This theme originated from my personal anxiety with dyslexia and an unwelcome dread of dementia. Scientific research led to the discovery that each time a memory is conjured, it is created through bits and pieces of experience and imagination. Every memory a human imagines is fabricated, it changes more and more every time we use it. A constant renewal is taking place; this means we are altering our memories without realising. Consequently all human memories are unreliable and unstable.

Thanks to Radiolab for these incredible insights.

Learning through drawing repetitive lines for extensive periods of time is a discipline which creates an internal rhythm. Repetition is implied but each line drawn is individual and separate. Each unique line has an impact on the proceeding line drawn. This ever-morphing, visual rhythm offers a representation of the metamorphosing human memory, where the first line made is nothing like the finishing line.

The visual journey of mem-orphosis lives in this online publication.

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

Sophie Giblin with lines, photo by Steve Glashier, 2013

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

10 of 20 meters on the bed by Sophie Giblin, 2013

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

Sophie Giblin with lines, photo by Steve Glashier, 2013

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

Sophie Giblin wearing mem-orphosis, photo by Steve Glashier, 2013

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

Stills from mem-orphpsis exhibit in Brighton, 2013

distorted self portrait of sophie giblin

Performance, De La Warr Bexhill, photo by Luke Twyman, 2014